FITTING ELECTRICAL RELAYS TO A 2CV
DISCONNECT THE BATTERY before commencing any of the procedures below.

2CVs produced during the late '70s and early '80s had no fuses protecting their headlamp circuits. And a frequent fault was for the terminals at the back of the light switch to get very hot. This could sometimes be cured by cleaning the contacts and drum inside the switch but the most satisfactory solution was to fit relays in the circuits and thus reduce the amount of current passing through the switch, at the same time overcoming the lack of fuses.

The original wiring was a single, usually grey wire, running from the light switch, round the back of the instrument panel, through the bulkhead and into the front wiring loom. The terminal on the light switch had a green sleeve for dip beam and a yellow sleeve for main beam. The colours on the joints on the lamp bar are the same.

Somewhere near the air filter, inside the loom insulation, each of these single wires was split into two, one for the left lamp the other for the right. This was done by means of a metal crimp. In the case of the main beam, this was also the place where a wire was joined to provide the feed for a main beam warning lamp, although the lamp itself was seldom provided for the UK market. It was usually a green wire running back up the loom to the back of the instrument panel where it ended in a spade terminal with a blue plastic cover and was taped to another wire with a spade terminal for the other side (earth) of the warning lamp.

If you decide to fit relays to your circuits the existing wires from the switch can be cut at the crimp and used to connect to terminals 86 of the relays. What is left of these wires, from the crimp to the joiners on the lamp bar, should be discarded. Use new wires, two for dip and two for main, from relay terminals 87 to the joints on the lamp bar. If you want a headlamp warning lamp, connect the green wire to terminal 87 of the main beam relay and source a suitable light for the instrument panel using one of the blanked holes.
THE WESSEX DUCKS
THE WESSEX DUCKS
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